Living at the Pink House

David Niven's home from 1946-1960,
David Niven’s home from 1946-1960, pictured for sale in 2018. The address text comes from Niven’s headed note-paper.

“David, the boys and I still live in the house he bought before we were married,” Hjördis explained in 1957. “It’s a lovely brick house, rather large and rambling. It has a huge green lawn which slopes down to the pool. (David and I always beat the guests at croquet because we know where the bumps are.) The back windows and porches look out on a most heavenly view of trees, green hills and the Pacific Ocean. I never want to live anywhere else.”

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There is an enduring fascination with David Niven’s main residences during his second marriage. This site already has image-laden pages devoted to his chalet in Chateau D’Oex and French Riviera property at Cap Ferrat. It’s now time for a look at the first house that David shared with Hjördis, before the couple’s move to Europe.

“The Pink House” on Amalfi Drive, Pacific Palisades (just over 15 miles from Hollywood), was built in 1933.  The first occupant was writer / screenwriter Vicky Baum, of ‘Grand Hotel’ fame. David bought the house in 1946, just before the tragic loss of his first wife, Primmie.

In 1960 David sold the property to producer and William Morris Talent Agency head Philip Kellogg (who incidentally died in 2012, one month short of his 100th birthday). It was later owned by actress Whoopi Goldberg. The Pink House came up for sale in 2018, allowing us to place David and Hjördis within their home environment, thanks to a set of rare images from 1948-1949 to compare with the modern-day property shots. For example, the property has three marble fireplaces, all intact from Hjördis’ day.

The 2018 property listings described the house as having: “217 feet of frontage and surrounded by lush landscaping and mature trees. The over 7,000-square-foot-home enjoys five en-suite bedrooms, seven bathrooms, and a remodeled kitchen overlooking the swimming pool. The offering also includes a separate guest house.”

Next page:  Lady of the manor, 1950